Sometimes, there’s one track that will change the billboards, and 30-year-old R&B/soul genius Jungkey’s ‘Anymore’ featuring MAMAMOO’s fantastic lead-vocal Wheein is that very track. And of course, with any billboard-changing track, there is a wonderfully produced MV accompanying it.

‘Anymore’, released on 7th March 2017, is a dramatic break-up track and the A-side for Jungkey’s single album, “EMPTY”. Interestingly though, Jungkey does not feature as a vocal on the track: it’s all Wheein but with Jungkey’s writing, composition, and lyrical genius underlying the entire track. It’s a beautifully executed ballad that will pluck at your heartstrings.

The MV for ‘Anymore’ is a well-produced story that begins with a relationship starting and ends with a sad farewell. What’s nice is to see Jungkey featuring as the main protagonist in a realistic portrayal of a relationship rather than the drama-like idealistic portrayals that Hallyu is famous for. However, unlike those portrayals we are left asking more questions than not!

The MV opens up in an independent coffee shop, with the waitress just closing up and turning the ‘Closed’ sign on the door, before a handsome bearded man (our Jungkey!) brazenly and assertively insists on having coffee with the waitress—who at this point has no idea who he is. From this one coffee begins a whole relationship that grows on the initiative of Jungkey and his affections for this one woman. However, there comes a point that she realises that ‘even that night when I was in your arms, even the moments that we were kissing, all those moments are left as wounds in my heart’ and she falls out of love with Jungkey becoming increasingly dismissive of him and pushes him away. At that, she just disappears and never returns back to the coffee shop, that remains closed.

The MV is beautifully executed: it’s peppered with scenes that show the development of their relationship and its demise, as well as memories and nostalgic moments that—I think we can assume from Jungkey’s perspective—are painful for him to recall as the relationship deteriorates. It’s a wonderfully realistic but subtle MV that, though lacking substance of true reasons for the deterioration of the relationship, precisely emphasises that very fact: relationships come and go and sometimes without reason.

Another interesting production aspect of this MV is that it is entirely focused solely on the two of them: there is no one else at this coffee shop or around them really. In some ways, this doubly emphasises one’s outlook when in a relationship. However, this is done through very careful recording and editing. If we do see other people around, they are faceless and in the background, without any specific identities, just around, but not engaged. Instead, this story is theirs and theirs alone.

What makes ‘Anymore’ such a special track—one that could win first place on shows like Inkigayo—is that this kind of MV and powerful ballad is candid and mature on its approach to love and relationships which other slightly younger groups have yet to have a handle on: it’s with Jungkey’s musical artistry that a beautiful track like this, along with the equally beautiful MV, can win you over and not push or pull you and make you like one character or the other but rather just sympathise with the situation. Overall, this MV is wonderful and you can understand, after watching it and listening to the track, why it has become so popular: it leaves a ‘wound in your heart’ that will be hard to heal.

Review written by Tariq

Jungkey - Anymore ft. WheeIn
Beautifully recorded and produced; the story is powerful but also normal, which makes its relatableit’s engaging and realistic
Does she just fall out of love with Jungkey or has something else happened here? We want answers!
4.0Overall Score
MV Rate
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